Ryan Beasley, Glass Marimba

Watch the video here.

A Glass Marimba

The main fundamentals behind this design are portability and sound quality, This is achieved by a deep wooden chamber with tapered sides, following the correct resonating node spots on the glass panels (22% of length inwards). The box has a closed bottom, meaning the glass could be slid out from their slots and left safely in the box for carrying to a performance or show.

What was important was making sure the glass rested on an open cell foam, meaning something with not too much density.

The back box is left slightly higher, allowing for the sharp keys to overlap the “white” keys, following a similar design to a piano so it could be approached and played easily by an experienced musicianIn my workings I took the glass pieces from the glass testing that were most in tune (which turned out to be a B note and the upper C note), then found the difference in size and the scaling between the two. My theory was the scaling between the two glasses would be consistent across the whole set, leaving me with 25 perfectly in tune notes. Of course this was incorrect and I found out the hard way that the scaling was way too precise (97.23% or something), so I left a lot of the glass tuning to trial and error, guess measurements and chipping away at glass to get the correct note.

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In my workings I took the glass pieces from the glass testing that were most in tune (which turned out to be a B note and the upper C note), then found the difference in size and the scaling between the two. My theory was the scaling between the two glasses would be consistent across the whole set, leaving me with 25 perfectly in tune notes. Of course this was incorrect and I found out the hard way that the scaling was way too precise (97.23% or something), so I left a lot of the glass tuning to trial and error, guess measurements and chipping away at glass to get the correct note.

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